WORDS : JOSH ABRAHAM

When Bury Tomorrow exploded onto the Southampton music scene it was a clear indication that there was something special there.  Even when the band were able to financially create music full time, lead singer Daniel Winter-Bates kept his job at the NHS because he fully believed in the U.K’s health system.  Even whilst on tour, the man’s devotion shows no bounds when he comes off a long shift to play a show and vice versa.

The general ideology is that all metal bands can do is scream and play insanely hard-hitting riffs, but this track in particular stands out as a middle finger to people who claim the band can only do metalcore

The debut album Portraits was released in 2009, where it was an interesting time in the world, from the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States, to NHS funding decreasing as much as it had in many years.  The one thing that kept the year flowing was the consistency of rock and metal music and this debut album is no different.

As the roaring guitar riffs and heavy vocals gallop into play, with the lyricism of “Don’t look any deeper you won’t like what you find” is an example of the self-reflective album.  It’s an album full of metalcore with glimpses of acoustic ballads that end up being the reason the Southampton based band stuck out like a sore thumb in the music scene.

Throughout the album, the theme of mental health is splattered across it, with the acoustic track ‘Relief’ where the soft touch of the acoustic guitar and lyricism about someone attempting suicide is where the band really show the diversity. The general ideology is that all metal bands can do is scream and play insanely hard-hitting riffs, but this track in particular stands out as a middle finger to people who claim the band can only do metalcore.

From start to finish, this masterpiece of a project is what many aspire to do

This was the album that generated so much momentum for the band to then tour continuously over the course of 2010, specifically touring across the United States, Europe and Japan, In their tours in 2010, the band supported Asking Alexandria, Of Mice & Men, Sleeping with Sirens, and Pierce the Veil, so it’s clear to see just how much of an impact this album had when touring with rock and metal legends. 

Tracks such as ‘Portraits’ and ‘These Woods Aren’t Safe For Us’ are examples of how not every track had to involve the screaming vocals, but it also kept showing the diversity within the band.

Although the album is no longer found on the many streaming services due to licensing agreements, this album is still a reminder of how emotional lyricism and heavy guitar riffs are the perfect ingredients for a cocktail that will always be wanted again and again.  

From start to finish, this masterpiece of a project is what many aspire to do, eleven years later the band are still releasing music, music that still touches on mental health and still touches on heavy guitar riffs that just go to show that music is the best way to deal with demons, especially as this album helped put Bury Tomorrow on the music map, where they belong.

Advertisement

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here