ARTIST : Broadside

ALBUM : Into The Raging Sea 

LABEL : SharpTone Records

RATING : 8/10

WORDS : Chris Prenatt

When Broadside dropped the “King Of Nothing/Empty” single late last year, one could easily think that the Richmond-based pop-punk quintet would continue to venture into their pop tendencies. Well that all changed when the first single off their new record Into The Raging Sea, “Foolish Believer”, dropped. It seemed that the troupe found their hard-hitting edge again, no longer sounding like Waterparks or Matt Skiba era Blink-182. 

The emotional value on these 13 tracks hits harder than anything they’ve given to us so far

On their third album and first with SharpTone Records, Broadside dust off their Old Bones (get it?) and sail past Paradise (eh?) to create a well-written pop-punk album while heading into raging seas. The emotional value on these 13 tracks hits harder than anything they’ve given to us so far. Producer Seth Henderson (Capstan, Knuckle Puck, Sleep On It) captures the raw energy that Broadside gives us, feeling stronger than ever. 

Kicking off the record is “The Raging Sea”, a three minute number that takes you on a trip across calm waters before getting pummeled by crushing waves, much like the title and album’s name says. Ollie Baxxter’s voice sounds like it’s fully hit its prime, going from a hypnotic tone to rough vocals that will shake you to your core when he screams “Is there any point? / What’s the fucking point?” 

in a span of three years, Broadside have perfected their craft and they’re now showing off how damn good they sound

The hits keep on rolling with “Nights Alone”, the catchiest track off the whole record which feels like Paradise but dialed up to 11. Pop and pop-punk mesh in well together well here. And the synth parts are quite cute. “Heavenly” is the best song We The Kings never wrote, and Travis Clark somewhere is beating himself up over that fact. The second to last track “The Setting Sun” packs quite the punch, with drummer Jeff Nichols quietly starting before guitarist Domenic Reid and bassist Patrick Diaz go in on the attack. This is the hardest hitting pop-punk track off the record, giving acts like Cartel and The Starting Line a run for their money. Other tracks like “Dancing On The Ceiling (With You)” and “Overdramatic” are good bops. 

But there are some hiccups with the album. “Breathe You In” has Broadside sounding like a Dirty Work-era All Time Low, but much like the lot of Dirty Work, it’s extremely empty sounding. You could cut this song out and it wouldn’t hurt the album at all. And the grand finale “Burning At Both Ends” isn’t a good ending, but it is a good song, nevertheless. It just leaves you saying “that’s the end?” Honestly “The Setting Sun” should’ve been the closer because it goes out on a high note. “Burning At Both Ends” isn’t as impactful as the previous number. 


Overall, Into The Raging Sea has Broadside walking on the fine line between pop-punk and pop without falling into consistently wobbling into each side. It is way beyond impressive that in a span of three years, Broadside have perfected their craft and they’re now showing off how damn good they sound. It’s hard to imagine that this is the same band who gave us Old Bones and Paradise, because they sound different in a great way. Impressive, fellas.

Into The Raging Sea is out now!

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