WORDS : HENRY CALVERT

Honey Lung are as sweet as they sound. The London-based shoegazed specialists have been taking the gig circuit by storm with their dreamy guitar tones that sugar-coats the melancholy that, unfortunately, life can hand you from time to time. Ahead of the release of their debut EP Post Modern Motorcade Music we had a chat with the band who consist of made up of Jamie Batten, Harry Chambers, David Sherry and Omri Covo. 

It’s important we only get back to gigging when it’s safe for everyone, but when we can, it’s going to make everyone appreciate the spirit and community at the heart of live music so much more than before

Most of the time we see releases like this accompanied by a string of shows to help promote the tracks, however obviously that is not feasible at the moment. Honey Lung have however been one of many artists to perform online joining Dork Magazine’s “Homeschool” festival.  

Speaking about what it’s like performing online then band said “It’s important right now as a lifeline for musicians but nothing can ever replace a true live show. It’s important we only get back to gigging when it’s safe for everyone, but when we can, it’s going to make everyone appreciate the spirit and community at the heart of live music so much more than before.”. This type of isolated interaction may be around for a long while, although we are definitely being hopeful, when asked how we can make these types of performances more interactive they continued “a virtual reality (VR) experience would be cool. It would be great to jam with our fans, hear and play with them in real-time without having to buy very expensive equipment and worry about slow internet connection.”  

Launching maybe a step further into the future they add “We’d also be able to have whole concerts online and live streamed for people with and without VR where you’re in a virtual room and everyone’s there with you. That kind of technology probably isn’t as far away as we think.” 

Clearly this time away from the world has allowed Honey Lung to put the final touches on the EP, its contents are what counts they say it’s “the product of one of the most turbulent and emotional periods we’ve had as a band, but it tells the stories of the experiences, the relationships, the growth, the good and the bad we’ve all felt since we started making it.”. Obviously, it hasn’t just come into fruition during this period as they continue “. It feels like a lifetime ago when we started laying down the initial demos, and we’ve recorded it with a few different people all over London, over a period of many months. Since it’s been such a long and fragmented process, a lot of different experiences and mental states have filtered into how it sounds.”

It was meant as an ode to a time he had there, which felt very isolated and gave him a lot of time to think about choices and relationships. It’s quite a personal song, it was a confusing time and things weren’t straight forward

One track in particular, “Big”, stands out as very vulnerable and makes you feel a little intrusive when listening to the lyrics, describing how the track came about they say “Jamie wrote it last year when he was up in Edinburgh for the fringe festival. It was meant as an ode to a time he had there, which felt very isolated and gave him a lot of time to think about choices and relationships. It’s quite a personal song, it was a confusing time and things weren’t straight forward.”, this is definitely cloaked by the sweltering summer beats that accompany the lyrics distracting from its downturned nature.  

A lot of Honey Lung’ lyrics dwell on past events retrospectively, and the video for Big itself captures these memories of the road over the past three years, they go on “Some of those memories seem a lifetime ago, especially footage from our tour of India, just before Harry was in the band. We’ve always wanted to make a video that gives a snapshot of our time on the road but some of those clips seem really pertinent now under the current circumstances.”

Prior to the current situation they headed over to New York for New Colossus festival describing the experience they add “None of us had ever been to New York before, and we got there just in time before the pandemic really took a hold of the city. Even towards the end of the trip things started to get serious. I don’t think anyone really expected the situation to get as bad as it eventually did; nothing like this has really ever happened in modern memory.”. Comparing the bands to London they add “They didn’t move around a whole lot but they were definitely engaged in a different way, listening intensely. It’s like the energy was more spiritual than physical.”

They’re already well acquainted with New York’s music scene after releasing a limited run of early recording through Brooklyn based label Kanine Records adding that in their latest LP they further explore ideas of looking inwards from “Memory” adding “Name is a good example of this, especially with the lyrics ‘nothing feels like the time we had’. We’ve always wanted to make music we like and make it relatable at the same time, which we feel occurs naturally anyway with the things Jamie writes about.”

All in all Honey Lung are ready to storm basements from Brixton to Brooklyn, whether that’s through a headset and set digitised goggles or wrapped in the warmth of a crowd, we’re yet to find out. Either way you’re sure to be encompassed by warmth listening to their new EP – Post Modern Motorcade Music. 

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