UNDER REVIEW : ELEPHANT TREE – HABITS

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ARTIST : Elephant Tree

ALBUM : Habits

LABEL : Holy Roar Records

RATING : 7/10

WORDS : Michael Woodworth

Progressive rock is the foundation that most of today’s scene was built off. Countless bands and projects have contributed to the iconic genre, and gives a wide variety of influences to pull from. By providing picturesque soundscapes reminiscent of your 90s summer, the blues rock 7-piece from London, UK Elephant Tree brought their A-game with their latest release Habits.

The album opens up with a quick intro, “Wake.Repeat (Intro)” with a slow-build sound that turns into low murmuring and dogs howling that moves right into the second track, “Sails.” This track pulls a strong, powerful 80s style rock intro out of thin air and a deep synth that matches the fervor of White ZombieThe post-chorus bridge highlights sprawling drum fills that sounds almost like a handful of rocks hitting the snare. Influences from Coldplay can also be heard on the track.

Strong strings follow combined with danger emitting undertones. The end of track mellows out and brings the listener into a sense of calm.

The album moves forward with “Faceless” and “Exit the Soul.” “Faceless” exhibits strong vocals with echoes matching drawn out harmonies as well as deep, punk infused riffs paired with mind-bending solos. “Exit the Soul” features group vocals at the beginning that transform into a soundscape set for a dark mountainside. The narrative changes and suddenly you’re transported to a lake on a foggy night. This is the song that makes you open up and reflect.

“The Fall Chorus” and “Broken Nails” strip back the energy and takes on more of an acoustic front. “The Fall Chorus” opening is fit for a western setting that slowly transforms into a medieval feel. Strong strings follow combined with danger emitting undertones. The end of track mellows out and brings the listener into a sense of calm. The final track, “Broken Nails” starts acoustic as well with echoed vocals in a church feel. The outro shows off true, raw energy.

“Bird” and “Wasted” round out the rest of the album. The script is flipped in these tracks as somber rock and progressive tones take the lead in both songs. With “Bird,” the track releases all the pent-up energy from the beginning of the album by utilizing floor tom focus and various instruments and allows to transport the listener back to the 90s progressive bang. “Wasted” showcases more of that progressive rock and highlights the bridge, where more sonic energy is released, bringing it back to the forefront of the project.

The album moves forward with “Faceless” and “Exit the Soul.” “Faceless” exhibits strong vocals with echoes matching drawn out harmonies as well as deep, punk infused riffs paired with mind-bending solos. “Exit the Soul” features group vocals at the beginning that transform into a soundscape set for a dark mountainside. The narrative changes and suddenly you’re transported to a lake on a foggy night. This is the song that makes you open up and reflect.

IMAGE CREDIT : ELEPHANT TREE FACEBOOK

In an increasingly unknown future, it’s nice to see you can be transported to the past with big time moves coming from big time blues rock players

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“The Fall Chorus” and “Broken Nails” strip back the energy and takes on more of an acoustic front. “The Fall Chorus” opening is fit for a western setting that slowly transforms into a medieval feel. Strong strings follow combined with danger emitting undertones. The end of track mellows out and brings the listener into a sense of calm. The final track, “Broken Nails” starts acoustic as well with echoed vocals in a church feel. The outro shows off true, raw energy.

“Bird” and “Wasted” round out the rest of the album. The script is flipped in these tracks as somber rock and progressive tones take the lead in both songs. With “Bird,” the track releases all the pent-up energy from the beginning of the album by utilizing floor tom focus and various instruments and allows to transport the listener back to the 90s progressive bang. “Wasted” showcases more of that progressive rock and highlights the bridge, where more sonic energy is released, bringing it back to the forefront of the project.

The album moves forward with “Faceless” and “Exit the Soul.” “Faceless” exhibits strong vocals with echoes matching drawn out harmonies as well as deep, punk infused riffs paired with mind-bending solos. “Exit the Soul” features group vocals at the beginning that transform into a soundscape set for a dark mountainside. The narrative changes and suddenly you’re transported to a lake on a foggy night. This is the song that makes you open up and reflect.

“The Fall Chorus” and “Broken Nails” strip back the energy and takes on more of an acoustic front. “The Fall Chorus” opening is fit for a western setting that slowly transforms into a medieval feel. Strong strings follow combined with danger emitting undertones. The end of track mellows out and brings the listener into a sense of calm. The final track, “Broken Nails” starts acoustic as well with echoed vocals in a church feel. The outro shows off true, raw energy.

“Bird” and “Wasted” round out the rest of the album. The script is flipped in these tracks as somber rock and progressive tones take the lead in both songs. With “Bird,” the track releases all the pent-up energy from the beginning of the album by utilizing floor tom focus and various instruments and allows to transport the listener back to the 90s progressive bang. “Wasted” showcases more of that progressive rock and highlights the bridge, where more sonic energy is released, bringing it back to the forefront of the project.

In an increasingly unknown future, it’s nice to see you can be transported to the past with big time moves coming from big time blues rock players. The blend of progressive and blues leads the listener on a journey of epic proportions. “Habits” is a strong album, proving Elephant Tree can harness powerful, edgy energy and redirect it into the warmest places of your heart.

Habits is out now via Holy Roar Records. 

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