In a time of political turbulence the need for anthems of solidarity are never far away. Whether this is Rage Against The Machine shutting down Wall Street in the early 2000s, or the likes of Tyler The Creator taking a stand against the ‘urban’ branding of the music industry, music has had the ability to bring together people, and take a stand for what is fair in a world that is far from perfect.

In our current climate, one of failing governments, uncertainty, economic corruption, and an even greater strain on the survival of the working class, CAN’T SWIM have joined the many forces speaking out, dropping their new politically charged, and heaviest release yet in the form of their surprise EP, When The Dust Settles. 

We’ve handed the megaphone to vocalist Chris LoPorto to play us his top 10 anthems that helped shape the world, and unite people in times of struggle.

1 – CAN’T SWIM POWER 

Highlighting the current political climate of the USA, it’s no surprise that Frank Carter also joined Can’t Swim to take a stand against the powers that be that have dominated, and in may ways terrorized both the USA and UK’s civilians.

2 – FUGAZI – MERCHANDISE

You can’t have a revolution if you don’t have punk. One of the founders of the late 80s / 90s punk and hardcore scene, Fugazi, and Ian McKaye’s former band, Minor Threat, have been a band cemented at the very centre of the punk ethos.

3 – THE CLASH – TOMMY GUN

In 1978 the UK was writhe with racially charged protests, the smashing of the far right, the European Court of Human Rights found the UK guilty of the mistreatment of Irish prisoners, with Margaret Thatcher sat leading the Tory party into a complete era of terror. But this is when London punk outfit, The Clash was needed the most, and as Black Flag legend Henry Rollins told the world as we lead ourselves into protest decades later, “this is what The Clash was preparing us for.”

4 – HATEBREED – WE STILL FIGHT 

Punk was about highlighting the problem, but hardcore was the answer. Whilst at times the band have come under scrutiny by having a certain form of skinhead present at their US shows, Hatebreed have made it clear, one loud anthem at a time. They stand for solidarity, and racism, sexism, and all other forms of prejudice are not welcome.

5 – PROTEST SONG ’68


Defeating capitalism, smashing the rise of far right political groups, and showing the world how we can envision a more serene world where all power is given to the people is something that was very high up on the agenda of Refused’s manifesto which accompanied the 1998 iconic record, The Shape Of Punk To Come. 

6 – PUBLIC ENEMY – FIGHT THE POWER 

Inspired by the Black Panther movement, and a heavy background in the evolvement of hip hop, Public Enemy for decades have found their anthems being at the forefront of the political and social justice. From having been played on the Bosnian B92 Radio station to encourage the fight for Serbian democracy through to leading the recent Bernie Sander’s rally, Fight The Power is a MUST track for anyone supporting the equality, fairness, and rights of the human race.

7 – BRUCE HORNSBY – THE WAY IT IS

Piano ballads are rarely seen as being used as a political tool, and whilst Hornby being a strong liberal democrat was far from that of rapper, Tu-Pac’s who used the song to fight racism, the song has standed the test of time as being one that has lead many a protest and march alike.

8 – CHILDISH GAMBINO – THIS IS AMERICA

When the video dropped for the 2018 single the USA was shook right to the core, having to stare directly into the mirror of a country that was quickly becoming more violent than any other place in the world. Whilst it’s an anthem to fill the dancefloor with it’s Afro-Carribean inspired bridges, the heavy samples of gun fire make you seen realise that this song is the voice for all of the minority neighbourhoods who have become victims of the violence of the state.

9 – MINOR THREAT – FILLER 

If you don’t recognise this album cover you need to give yourself a long, hard and stern look before calling yourself a punk. Having formed at the height of the late 70s and early 80s in none other than Washington DC, McKaye’s ethos of hard work, and in some ways socialist views are translated loudly and clearly through the iconic self titled EP.

10 – RADIOHEAD – IDIOTEQUE

Ah yes, even before you listen to this song the title can already be used to describe the etiquette of many a world leader right now. An interesting anthem for feminism, the track confronts how the world is caught between regressing and progressing for a world that’s fair for all.

WHEN THE DUST SETTLES IS OUT NOW VIA PURE NOISE RECORDS.

 

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