FROM: SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA | FOR FANS OF: IN HEARTS WAKE, LOTUS EATER 

Australia has always been a stomping ground for heavy music. Whether it was the forefathers of Parkway Drive laying down metallic riffs by the dozens, or the likes of the underground hardcore and early metalcore scene birthing the likes of I Killed The Prom Queen and Carpathian, the word heavy is never too far away from this nation’s musical vocabulary.

But like anything, when there is a lot of it, that means there is a lot to filter through. But don’t worry because we’ve got you covered, and we’re introducing you to a band that’s blend of metal-tinged melodic riffs, stadium sized choruses, jagged, yet beautifully chaotic sound is something that won’t leave your head for days, and short of leaving your ears ringing. This is Sydney’s Elision, and this is one of the band’s to once more redefine a new world of heavy music.

“IT’S EASY TO FALL INTO A TRAP OF WRITING MUSIC THAT IS UNCONDITIONALLY OPTIMISTIC.”

First off, your latest release ‘The Other’ is an unapologetic critique of
the world in its current state. How important do you feel it is to not
only have a platform in which to convey your views through your music? 

Oliver (Clark, Guitarist): “For me, that’s what heavy music has always been about first and foremost. A platform where artists can express themselves in whatever way they see fit, rather than being key holed by labels and executives that force them to
write based on what is appealing to the masses. This was absolutely essential for me back when I was slowly falling down the rabbit hole of heavier genres.  I’m obviously not a fan of those overly ‘preachy’ kinds ofbands, but I have a huge admiration for those lyricists that use their writing as a means of engaging the public with something they feel strongly about. It’s easy to fall into a trap of writing music that is unconditionally pessimistic. We’re hopeful as well.”

Let’s talk genre. Australia is renowned for mass producing heavy bands. Whilst this ensures a strong scene how does it also make it harder to break through and stand out? 

Elliot (Koroneos, Bass): The Australian heavy music scene at the moment is thriving with so many talented bands and I think what’s important is how we define ourselves
through our sound. When people listen to our music, we want them to know that it’s Elision they’re listening to. We want our uniqueness translated through our songs and that’s becoming more and more prevalent as we continue to release new music. In terms of breaking through as a heavier band, I think what we do really well is consolidate a variety of styles from the heavy genres so that there is a little bit of something for everybody to listen to in our songs.”

“WE WANT THEM TO KNOW THAT IT IS ELISION THAT THEY ARE LISTENING TO.”

You’re a band that many have described as a live band to reckoned with. Do you always produce music with the live aspect in mind? 

Elliot: “We’ve always taken pride in how music translates to our audience in a live setting. As a band, we strive to play the best show possible at every gig we’ve ever played. It’s always a good feeling to see people banging their heads or moshing to our songs. That gives us even more positive energy to hammer it out on stage and interact with our audience. We put a lot of pressure on ourselves to be the standout band on the night so we work really hard and practice a whole lot not just individually but as a group.”

Your latest single, ‘The Other’, this overwhelmingly melancholic perspective on the current state of affairs in the world…

Lachlan (Boundy, Vocals) “The Other highlights the reality that we as a society are gradually destroying the world through greed, over consumption and malicious carelessness. Having said this though, the underlying message of the track is certainly that even with all the chaos around us, there is still hope if we all come together to combat these issues. This is really integral to us as aband, positive action and strength can only be found through  unity.”

“IT HIGHLIGHTS THAT PEOPLE FEEL CONSTANTLY FEEL LIKE THEY DON’T HAVE A VOICE.”

In a time where we’re falling to pandemics, and then also the bush
fires, how have you found that music has united people? And do you
feel we should be more weary of how we treat one another?

“I find that all genres of music have a unifying factor but in my experience I find that the heavy scene has a more tight knit community as it is a niche genre. I also think that the heavy scene has highlighted more than others, about the seriousness of mental health issues through its use of politicised and emotionally charged lyrics which comforts and also informs its listeners. I think that is important, especially in a time of bushfires and global pandemics that’s causing a lot of social insecurity.”

Finally, in what ways do you feel your newest single “The Other” stands out
from previous releases?

I think that our single “The Other” is a progressive shift both lyrically and instrumentally. In our previous singles The End Of Man and Human Vessel we had been touching on issues more related to the spiritual and cultural state of the world. Where we feel “The Other” comes into its own, is in the depth with which it explores the social and environmental issues that are prevalent within a decaying society, and it highlights that the people constantly feel like they don’t have a voice”.

 

 

 

 

 

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